Category Archives: natural beauty

Sea to Sky – up on Dakota Ridge

It’s crazy how quickly you can hop out of your boat or kayak at sea level and be immersed in an all white winter-land forest.

The road leaves the seaside at Wilson Creek and climbs steadily for about 13K. Here the elevation is more than enough to safeguard winter for many months. Cross country, snowshoe, snowmobile and tobogganing conditions are superb.

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A more southerly perspective on cove views

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Apparently the weather has been a little inclement in secret cove these last few days. We’d love to show you a couple of pics of snow covered boats. Regretfully we can’t as our view has been obscured for a week or so. We’re so disappointed….

Busy, Busy

tree-1I don’t think the beavers got the necessary permits for this one.  Dropped this sucker right across the boardwalk. I guess they like challenges as there are lots of smaller trees to naw on.

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They are making progress though.  A couple more trees and the whole forest will be swamped.

 

23 minutes to Tattenham

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The water over the last few days has been glass – perhaps the nicest water all summer. Except that its no longer summer.

The crossing of welcome passage, from Tiki Island to the Tattenham Ledge was only 23 minutes of effortless paddling. Add in 10 minutes from the dock to Tiki, and 15 minutes to cross Buccaneer Bay, and you’ve got cove to Beach in less than an hour.

Summer Gets Quiet (in a hurry)

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The beach at Sargeant’s Bay gets quiet on a labour day Monday.

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All right. All right. They really are veggie burgers. But…the wine is good. The view from a little point between Tidewater and Smugglers’s Cove is great.

To Simson in a Tin Boat

Simson Provincial Park might be the least visited provincial park within a couple of hours of Vancouver. It’s so close and just a little bit tricky to get to.

Occupying most of South Thormanby Island it’s accessible by boat only, ideally a small one or a kayak. In this case we took our 20′ tin boat which we could drive up quite nicely on to the rocky beach at Farm Bay.

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There’s good camping in a small clearing just above the beach. There’s also a great spot in Long Bay, just next door.

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The walking is easy through the old logging roads and skid trails that cross the island. Farm Bay Road is the major route. Signage is not to the usual provincial park spec.

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The beavers here are especially talented. This is one of the prettiest dams we’ve seen, and makes an excellent foot bridge. The dam creates a small lake, which is now beginning to flood the apple and cherry orchards of the original farm.

If only I could shed (a few pounds) – just like this

Secret Cove offers a rocky encroachment to the Pacific as it ebbs and floods through the Malaspina and Georgia Straits. This is perfect habitat for the Arbutus tree. These trees don’t like a lot of soil, but they need the sound and the spray of the nearby ocean.

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The Arbutus is deciduous tree, but not at all typical. It always has leaves. New leaves grow and old ones die still, but there is never a moment with no leaves. In the summer, however (right now) the reddish brown bark sheds its skin just like a bad sunburn. The bark is,paper thin. It curls up and falls to the ground. The exposed layer is green, but will turn red again by winter.

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One of our little ones….

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